Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery

Rabbits:

RabbitsRabbits are susceptible to a variety of diseases and conditions, including overgrown teeth, hairballs, parasites, infections, diarrhea and cancer. They also tend to hide signs of illness or pain. Contact us if your rabbit exhibits:

  • Ocular or nasal discharge or sneezing
  • Scratching at the ears or drooped ears
  • Drooling, dropping food or not eating
  • Head Tilt
  • Hair loss, scratching, poor hair coat
  • Diarrhea
  • Decreased appetite or decreased stool production
  • Lethargy
  • Weight Loss
  • Other abnormal behavior

Iguanas and other Lizards

AA027419Most conditions in iguanas and lizards and caused by underlying nutritional disorders or improper husbandry. We provide new lizard owners information on appropriate enclosures, environmental requirements, sanitation, and disease prevention. Because they hide their illnesses well, in the event of an emergency, please call our office promptly.

Gerbils, Guinea pigs, Mice, Chinchillas, Hamsters and other Pocket Pets

AA027408Proper nutrition and appropriate housing is very important when caring for exotic animals. We provide new pet owners information on appropriate enclosures, environmental requirements, sanitation, and disease prevention. These small pocket pets hide their illnesses well and should see a veterinarian promptly in the event of:

  • Ocular or nasal discharge or sneezing
  • Drooling, dropping food or not eating
  • Hair loss, scratching, poor hair coat,
  • Diarrhea
  • Decreased appetite or decreased stool production
  • Lethargy
  • Weight loss
  • Other abnormal behavior

Ferrets:

AA028216Common conditions associated with ferrets include gastrointestinal disease, parasites, and cancer. In addition, ferrets are inquisitive creatures by nature and frequently ingest objects they shouldn’t. Ferrets benefit from receiving vaccinations.Please bring a stool sample to your ferret’s annual exam so we can test for internal parasites. Unless you are planning to breed your ferret, we recommend that he or she be spayed or neutered. In fact, spaying can save a ferret’s life. Jills that haven’t been spayed will stay in heat until they’re bred. This condition can cause anemia (a decrease in red blood cells), which can be fatal. In male ferrets, neutering can reduce their strong body odor, prevent marking, and reduce aggressive behavior.

Please contact us promptly if your ferret develops any unusual symptoms such as:

  • Ocular or nasal discharge or sneezing
  • Drooling, dropping food or not eating
  • Black ear wax
  • Hair loss, scratching, poor hair coat,
  • Diarrhea
  • Decreased appetite or decreased stool production
  • Lumps
  • Abdominal Swelling
  • Vaginal Swelling
  • Increase in aggression or sexual behavior
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Weight loss
  • Other abnormal behavior
Location Hours
Monday8:00am – 7:00pm
Tuesday8:00am – 7:00pm
Wednesday8:00am – 7:00pm
Thursday8:00am – 7:00pm
Friday8:00am – 7:00pm
Saturday8:00am – 1:00pm
SundayClosed