FAQs

1. What are the hours that Countryside is open?

Hours: Monday – Friday from 8AM – 7PM and Saturdays from 8AM – 1PM.
Appointments: Monday-Friday from 9AM–Noon & 2PM – 7PM; Saturdays 9AM-1PM.
Surgeries and Dentals: Mondays through Fridays
Grooming: Monday through Saturday.
Boarding: Check-in and Check-out Monday through Saturday.
Please call us at (410) 461-2400.

2. What should I do if my pet is having an emergency?

If your pet is having an emergency during our hospital hours, please call us at (410) 461-2400 if you can, but we will gladly accommodate emergencies anytime.

If your pet has an emergency after hours, please contact the Emergency Animal Hospital located at 10270 Baltimore National Pike (Route 40) at (410) 750-1177.

3. What type of payment do you accept?

Our hospital accepts: Cash, Personal Checks, VISA, MasterCard, Discover, American Express and Care Credit

4. How do I get my pet’s prescription medication refills?

Our in-house pharmacy is fully stocked with medications, supplements, dental products, heartworm preventives, flea and tick products, non-prescription diets and prescription diets. Please call ahead (410) 461-2400 or request a refill through our website, or through your Countryside Veterinary Clinic App.

5. What is a trusted source of veterinary animal health information?

Please call to speak to one of our staff members or our veterinarians at (410) 461-2400.
A trusted online source is veterinarypartner.com.

6. When should my new puppy be examined or vaccinated?

Congratulations on your new puppy! Puppies need their first check-up as soon as possible. Our veterinarians will examine your puppy from head to tail, discuss diets, behavioral training, and administer any necessary vaccinations. Please come with a fecal sample to your initial visit and our team will take all the time necessary to start you and your puppy off on the right foot, together!

7. When should my new kitten be examined or vaccinated?

Congratulations on your new kitten! Kittens need their first check-up as soon as possible. Our veterinarians will examine your kitten from head to tail, discuss diets, behavioral training, socialization with other cats, and administer any necessary vaccinations. Please come with a fecal sample and our team will take all the time necessary to start you and your kitten off on the right foot, together!

8. When should my new dog be examined or vaccinated?

Congratulations on your new dog! Dogs new to your household need their first check-up as soon as possible. Our veterinarians will examine your new canine family member from head to tail, discuss diets, behavioral training, and administer any necessary vaccinations. Please come with a fecal sample to your initial visit and our team will take all the time necessary to start you and your dog off on the right foot, together!

9. When should my new cat be examined or vaccinated?

Congratulations on your new cat! New cats to your household need their first check-up as soon as possible. Our veterinarians will examine your new feline family member from head to tail, discuss diets, behavioral training, socialization with other cats, and administer any necessary vaccinations. Please come with a fecal sample and our team will take all the time necessary to start you and your cat off on the right foot, together!

10. What vaccines (shots) does my puppy need?

Puppies need a series of vaccines, beginning at 8 weeks of age, to protect them from viruses and bacteria. Core vaccines include Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parinfluenza and Parvovirus, usually administered as a single multivalent vaccine. Maryland law states that all dogs and cats maintain a current Rabies vaccine. Bordetella and Canine Influenza, upper respiratory viruses, spread from dog to dog in households, neighborhoods, doggie day cares, dog parks, boarding and grooming facilities, etc. Lyme disease is transferred by ticks. For this reason we vaccinate all puppies with a series beginning at 8 weeks of age and booster all adult adult dogs annually or every three years as dictated by your pet’s lifestyle, AAHA guidelines and local law.
Every canine additionally needs heartworm and flea and tick prevention all 12 months of the year in Maryland.

11. What vaccines (shots) does my dog need?

Puppies need a series of vaccines, beginning at 8 weeks of age, to protect them from viruses and bacteria. Core vaccines include Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parinfluenza and Parvovirus, usually administered as a single multivalent vaccine. Maryland law states that all dogs and cats maintain a current Rabies vaccine. Bordetella and Canine Influenza, upper respiratory viruses, spread from dog to dog in households, neighborhoods, doggie day cares, dog parks, boarding and grooming facilities, etc. Lyme disease is carried by ticks. For this reason we vaccinate all puppies with a series beginning at 8 weeks of age and booster all adult dogs annually or every three years as dictated by your pet’s lifestyle, AAHA guidelines and local law.
Every canine additionally needs heartworm and flea and tick prevention all 12 months of the year in Maryland.

12. What vaccines (shots) does my kitten need?

Kittens need a series of vaccines, beginning at 8 weeks of age, to protect them from viruses. Core vaccines include Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (feline herpesvirus 1), Panleukopenia, and Calicivirus. Maryland law states that all cats and dogs maintain a current Rabies vaccine. Feline Leukemia is recommended in all kittens and revaccinated according to lifestyle. For this reason we vaccinate all kittens with a series beginning at 8 weeks of age and booster all adult cats annually or every three years as dictated by your pet’s lifestyle, AAHA, AVMA guidelines and local law.
All kittens or new cats to a household need a feline leukemia/feline immunodeficiency virus blood test.

13. What vaccines (shots) does my cat need?

Kittens need a series of vaccines, beginning at 8 weeks of age, to protect them from viruses. Core vaccines include Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (feline herpesvirus 1), Panleukopenia, and Calicivirus. Maryland law states that all cats and dogs maintain a current Rabies vaccine. Feline Leukemia is recommended in all kittens and revaccinated according to lifestyle. For this reason we vaccinate all kittens with a series beginning at 8 weeks of age and booster all adult cats annually or every three years as dictated by your pet’s lifestyle, AAHA, AVMA guidelines and local law.
All kittens or new cats to a household need a feline leukemia/feline immunodeficiency virus blood test.

14. How should I protect my puppy or dog from fleas and ticks?

Dogs and puppies should be protected against fleas and ticks all 12 months of the year in Maryland. Medications applied to the skin (topicals), and medications given orally are available for puppies and dogs. Not all flea and tick medications are equally safe and effective.
Countryside recommends Vectra as a modern, effective topical medication to prevent fleas and ticks because it also serves as a repellant to stop the initial bite of fleas, ticks and mosquitos.
Countryside also recommends the oral products Bravecto and Nexgard that have a rapid kill once the flea or tick bites.
It is important to prevent ticks to prevent tick-borne diseases such as Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, etc.

15. How should I protect my kitten or cat from fleas and ticks?

Cat and kittens should be protected against fleas and ticks all 12 months of the year in Maryland:
If they go outside in the yard on go on balconies or porches
If they live in a household with other cats that go outside
If they live in a household with dogs that go outside
Medications applied to the skin (topicals), and 6-month injectables are available
Countryside recommends Revolution, monthly, and Bravecto, every three months as effective topical medications to prevent fleas and ticks in cats and kittens.
Not all flea and tick medications are equally safe and effective.

16. How do I protect my puppy or dog from heartworm disease?

Mosquitoes transmit heartworm disease in dogs. The heartworms live in the heart and pulmonary vessels causing heart failure. Signs may include, a cough, heart murmur, fluid in the abdomen, exercise intolerance, weight loss and death. Administering an oral heartworm tablet, recommended for all 12 months of the year in Maryland, can prevent heartworm disease. Countryside recommends Trifexis heartworm preventive because it protects against heartworm disease, intestinal parasites and additionally kills adult fleas.

17. How often should my cat go to the veterinarian for a check-up or a wellness exam?

All cats should have a veterinary examination at least one a year. Cats typically hide signs of illness so examinations are important to check for dental disease, heart disease, weight gain or weight loss, and to discuss changes in appetite, water consumption, litter box behavior, vomiting, etc. Your veterinarian may suggest early detection blood work to further evaluate your cat’s health. Have we seen your cat, lately? Information discussed along with a thorough physical examination provide you and your veterinarian with a plan to help your pet remain healthy.

18. How often should my dog go to the veterinarian for a check-up or wellness examination?

All dogs should have a veterinary examination at least one a year. Your veterinarian will check for underlying illness such as dental disease, heart disease, weight gain or weight loss, and to discuss changes in appetite, water consumption, mobility, energy level, etc. Your veterinarian may suggest early detection blood work to further evaluate your dog’s health. Heartworm preventative and flea and tick preventative and nutritional recommendations will all be discussed. Information discussed, along with a thorough physical examination, provide you and your veterinarian with a plan to help your pet remain healthy.

19. When should I have my male kitten/cat neutered?

Typically, male kittens are neutered at 6 months of age to prevent breeding and to discourage behavioral concerns such as roaming and spraying.

20. When should I have my female kitten/cat spayed?

Typically, female kittens are spayed at 6 months of age to prevent breeding and to help protect them from serious health problems later in life such as breast cancer and uterine infections.

21. When should I have my female puppy/dog spayed?

Typically, female dogs are spayed at 6 months of age to prevent breeding and to help protect them from serious health problems later in life such as breast cancer and uterine infections. The field of veterinary medicine is currently discussing the benefits and risks of spaying dogs when they are more mature. Consult your veterinarian about the most appropriate time to spay your pet based on her breed, age, health risks and benefits. The American Veterinary Medical Association states, “The procedure has no effect on a pet’s intelligence or ability to learn, play, work or hunt. Some pets tend to be better behaved following surgical removal of their ovaries, making them more desirable companions.”

22. When should I have my female puppy/dog neutered?

Typically, male dogs are neutered at 6 months of age to prevent breeding and to help protect them from serious health problems later in life such as benign prostatic hyperplasia, testicular cancer, perineal hernias and perianal adenomas. The field of veterinary medicine is currently discussing the benefits and risks of neutering dogs when they are more mature. Consult your veterinarian about the most appropriate time to neuter your pet based on his breed, age, health risks and benefits. The American Veterinary Medical Association states, “The procedure has no effect on a pet’s intelligence or ability to learn, play, work or hunt. Some pets tend to be better behaved following surgical removal of their testes, making them more desirable companions.”

23. What is canine influenza or the dog flu?

Canine Influenza is a highly contagious respiratory infection of dogs caused by two influenza strains, H3N8 or H3N2. Most dogs develop the mild form of the disease with a soft moist cough or a dry hacking cough, mild lethargy, and possibly sneezing and an eye discharge. Some dogs present with the severe form with high fevers and pneumonia. Vaccines for both strains are available and are considered “lifestyle” vaccines, meaning the decision to vaccinate is based on the dog’s risk of exposure from other dogs in dog parks, doggie day care facilities, grooming and boarding facilities, neighborhood walks, etc.

24. Do indoor kittens and cats require Rabies vaccines?

Maryland Law states that all cats and dogs four months of age must be vaccinated against rabies.

25. Do I need to vaccinate my puppy/dog against Rabies?

Maryland Law states that all dogs and cats four months of age must be vaccinated against rabies.

26. Do I need an appointment to bring my dog or cat or exotic pet to Countryside Veterinary Clinic?

Scheduling an appointment allows us to better serve you by having your file prepared, a veterinarian ready to see you when you arrive and to decrease your wait time. We have office hours appointments Monday through Friday from 9am -noon and 2:00 – 7:00pm and Saturday hours from 9am – 1:00pm. Please call (410) 461-2400 to schedule an appointment. A limited number of appointments can be scheduled through our webpage and Pet Portal system. Countryside Veterinary Clinic will also see walk-in appointments as quickly as possible.

27. Do you see small pocket pets such as guinea pigs and hamsters?

Yes, we see a variety of small exotics including, but not limited to, hamsters, guinea pigs, gerbils, rats, ferrets, chinchillas, hedgehogs, geckos, turtles, etc.

28. What should I do if my puppy or dog is limping?

Limping is one of the top ten reasons that pets visit veterinarians each year. At Countryside, we compile a thorough history followed by a comprehensive lameness examination to determine the cause of the lameness and then develop an appropriate treatment plan. Congenital and inherited disease, trauma, infectious disease, spinal disease, osteoarthritis, cruciate ligament tears, strains, sprains, fractures, neuromuscular disease and cancers are all causes of lameness. If your pet’s limping is severe or persistent, call us at (410) 461-2400 for a lameness evaluation.

29. What should I do if my kitten or cat is limping?

At Countryside, we compile a thorough history followed by a comprehensive lameness examination to determine the cause of a lameness and then develop an appropriate treatment plan. Congenital and inherited disease, trauma, abscesses, osteoarthritis, are the most common causes of imping in kittens and cats. If your pet’s limping is severe or persistent, contact us at (410) 461-2400 for a lameness evaluation.

30. Why does my puppy/dog eat grass?

Many dogs regularly nibble on a small amount of grass. The reason for this unclear. However, when nibbling turns into eating, or when there are other signs of disease, it is time to call your veterinarian. Call us at (410) 461-2400.

31. What should I do if my puppy/dog is vomiting?

Vomiting is never normal in puppies or dogs. There are many causes ranging from intestinal parasites, dietary indiscretion, toxicities, foreign body obstructions, metabolic disease such as kidney disease, etc. Our veterinarians will take a thorough history, complete a comprehensive physical examination and make recommendations regarding additional testing such as blood work or radiographs to make a correct diagnosis and begin an appropriate treatment plan. Call us at (410) 461-2400 for an appointment.

32. What should I do if my kitten or cat is vomiting?

Vomiting is never normal in kittens. Vomiting in cats may be due to grooming and hairball formation, intestinal parasites, dietary indiscretion, foreign body obstruction, metabolic causes such as kidney disease or hyperthyroidism, inflammatory bowel disease, etc. Our veterinarian will take a thorough history, complete a comprehensive physical examination and make recommendations regarding additional testing such as blood work or radiographs to make a correct diagnosis and begin an appropriate treatment plan. Call us at (410) 461-2400 for an appointment.

33. What should I do if my puppy or dog is not eating?

Any puppy or dog that is not eating can have a serious health issue. Please call us at (410) 461-2400 for an appointment.

34. What should I do if my kitten or cat is not eating?

Any kitten or cat that is not eating can have a serious health issue. Please call us at (410) 461-2400.

35. My puppy or dog is scratching. What should I do?

Itching, scratching, self-biting and licking can be signs of fleas, food allergies, environmental allergens, mites, bacterial infections, bee stings, other insect bites, fungal infections, yeast infections, non-skin diseases and other causes. Providing an accurate history of when and where the signs began, whether other pets or family members are affected, and results of prior treatments can help your veterinarian diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately. Call us at (410) 461-2400 for an appointment.

36. My kitten or cat is scratching. What should I do?

Itching, scratching, self-biting and licking can be signs of fleas, food allergies, environmental allergens, mites, bacterial infections, bee stings, other insect bites, fungal infections, yeast infections, non-skin diseases and other causes. Providing an accurate history of when and where the signs began, whether other pets or family members are affected, and results of prior treatments can help your veterinarian diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately. Call us at (410) 461-2400 for an appointment.

37. What should I do if my puppy/dog is shaking his head or scratching his ears?

Puppies and dogs may shake their head or scratch their ears if they are experiencing ear discomfort from mites, bacterial infections, yeast infections, environmental allergies, food allergies, insect bites, and many other causes. Please call your veterinarian to have your pet examined to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately. Call us at (410) 461-2400 for an appointment.

38. What should I do if my kitten or cat is shaking his head or scratching his ears?

Kittens and cats may shake their head or scratch their ears if they are experiencing ear discomfort from mites, bacterial infections, yeast infections, environmental allergies, food allergies, insect bites, and many other causes. Please call your veterinarian to have your pet examined to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately. Call us at (410) 461-2400 for an appointment.

39. What should I do if my puppy or dog has diarrhea?

Loose stool or diarrhea in puppies and dogs may be caused from intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, giardia or coccidia infections, food allergies, dietary indiscretion, food changes, inflammatory bowel disease, liver or kidney disease, medications, stress, spoiled foods, toxins such as mushrooms, cancer, and many other causes. Diarrhea may be accompanied by decreased appetite, lethargy, vomiting, weight loss, and dehydration. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for a complete physical examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

40. What should I do if my kitten or cat has diarrhea?

Loose stool or diarrhea in kittens and cats may be caused from intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, giardia or coccidia infections, food allergies, dietary indiscretion, food changes, inflammatory bowel disease, liver or kidney disease, medications, stress, spoiled foods, toxins, cancer and many other causes. Diarrhea may be accompanied by decreased appetite, lethargy, vomiting, weight loss, and dehydration. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for a complete physical examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

41. What should I do if my puppy or dog is urinating more frequently?

Frequent urination, straining to urinate, blood tinged urine or urinating small amounts may all indicate urinary inflammation or infection caused by bacterial infection, bladder stones, obstruction, cancer, or other causes. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for a complete physical examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

42. What should I do if my kitten or cat is urinating more frequently?

Frequent urination, straining to urinate, blood tinged urine or urinating small amounts may all indicate urinary inflammation or infection caused by bacterial infection, stress, bladder stones, obstruction, cancer, or other causes. Contact us at (410 461-2400 for a complete physical examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

43. What should I do if my puppy or dog or kitten or cat is rubbing their eye or squinting?

Squinting, tearing, or rubbing the eye can be a sign of infection, trauma, allergic reaction, foreign body, etc. Call us at (410) 461-2400 for an examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

44. My dog, cat, puppy, or kitten is drooling. What should I do?

Excessive salivation or drooling may be due to a toxin, teeth or mouth pain, mouth infection, a foreign body in the mouth, or due to metabolic causes such as renal disease, etc. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for an examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

45. My kitten or cat is coughing. What should I do?

Coughing in kittens or cats may be due to hairball obstruction, allergic reactions, feline asthma, pneumonia, heartworm disease, cancer, etc. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for an examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

46. Why is my puppy or dog coughing?

Coughing in puppies and dogs may be due to infectious causes such as kennel cough or other upper respiratory viruses, heartworm disease, heart disease, pneumonia, foreign bodies, collapsing trachea, pulmonary disease, cancer, etc. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for an examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

47. Why is my kitten or cat sneezing?

Kittens and cats most commonly sneeze due to upper respiratory infections such as Calicivirus, Feline Herpesvirus 1, or due to secondary bacterial infections. Sneezing may also be caused by foreign bodies, fungal infections, allergic causes, and cancer, etc. Call us at (410) 461-2400 for an examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

48. Why is my puppy or dog sneezing?

Puppies and dogs most commonly sneeze due to upper respiratory infections such bordetella, mycoplasma, parinfluenza, etc. Sneezing may also be caused by fungal infections, allergic reactions, foreign bodies, or cancer, etc. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for an examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

49. Why is my dog drinking so much water?

Dogs may drink an excess of water if they have diabetes, kidney disease, liver disease, an over production of steroids, a uterine infection, hypercalcemia, from certain medications such as steroids and from many other causes. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for an examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

50. Why is my cat drinking so much water?

Cats may drink an excess of water if they have diabetes, kidney disease, liver disease, a uterine infection, hypercalcemia, from certain medications, and from many other causes. Contact us at (410) 461-2400 for an examination to diagnose and treat your pet quickly and appropriately.

51. What should I feed my puppy or dog, kitten or cat?

Choosing a pet food can be overwhelming. We recommend choosing from name brand foods trusted by your veterinarian. Companies such as Purina, Hill’s, Royal Canin, and Iams use veterinary nutritionists to develop and maintain diets, follow strict AAFCO guidelines, and answer phone calls to assist if your pet has special dietary needs. According to the Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center website, “no objective scientific evidence has yet demonstrated that feeding Grain Free, Natural, Holistic, Organic, or Raw diets to otherwise healthy pets, when compared to conventional diets, leads to a better outcome for the pet.”

52. What special care does my senior pet require?

Thanks to preventive medicine and dental care, good nutrition, advanced veterinary procedures, and safe, nurturing home environments, our pets are living longer than ever before! On average, pets are geriatric at the age of 10. Common health conditions in older dogs include arthritis, vision loss, hearing loss, kidney disease, heart disease, liver disease, and cancer. Additionally, older dogs may suffer from cognitive dysfunction, a condition similar to senility in humans.

Common health conditions in geriatric cats include kidney disease, hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland), diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. These conditions often display weight loss as a primary symptom. Most of these diseases can be managed to improve your cat’s quality of life.

The best way to treat geriatric health conditions is to diagnose them early through wellness exams and periodic blood tests. Call us for an appointment at (410) 461-2400.

53. Should I brush my pet’s teeth at home?

Regular at-home dental care is recommended to help maintain your pet’s oral and overall health. Home dental care for your pet should start early, even before their adult teeth come in. Pet owners should brush their pet’s teeth frequently as tooth brushing is the best method of preventing plaque, calculus, and bacterial build-up. There are also additional options for at-home dental care such as dental formulated foods, water additives, and dental treats.

54. When does my pet need blood work?

We recommend annual blood work as an early detection screen to detect underlying medical conditions as soon as possible. In many situations, early detection is essential for more effective treatment. Blood work is also necessary during times of illness or prior to any anesthetic procedure. The type of blood work required will be determined specifically for each pet depending on his or her individual needs.

55. Why does my pet need a dental cleaning and how often should this be done?

Professional dental exams, tooth scaling, and polishing are necessary to maintain healthy teeth and gums for your pet. Oral diseases can have a negative impact on your pet’s overall health. We recommend annual wellness examinations which includes a professional dental exam by our veterinarians.

56. Do you perform dental services?

Yes! Our veterinarians have taken advanced courses in veterinary dentistry to provide routine dental cleanings and advanced surgical tooth extractions for abscessed teeth, fractured teeth, resorptive lesions, dental and skull x-rays, etc. Please call us at 410 461-2400 and one of our helpful team members will help you schedule a dental appointment.

57. Do you microchip dogs and cats?

Yes! We highly recommend microchips for all cats and dogs! A microchip is a small chip about the size of a grain of rice that is injected underneath the skin between the shoulder blades at the back of the neck. This chip contains a unique number that can be retrieved using a microchip scanner. The unique number is used to identify the pet in order for the owners to be contacted in the case of a lost or stolen pet. This simple injection does not require anesthesia and is performed at kitten and puppy visits, any well check and also on microchip appointments. Call us at (410) 461-2400 to have your pet microchipped and then registered by our front desk staff!

58. Do you perform laser therapy?

Yes! Laser therapy uses light energy to increase the metabolic energy of cells to accelerate tissue repair and cell growth, to reduce inflammation which reduces pain and to promote healing. Laser therapy also stimulates the suppression of nerve cells and releases endorphins, helping to decrease pain and discomfort. It is used for tendon and ligament injuries, post-operative inflammation, wounds, burns, and chronic degenerative joint disease (arthritis). By calling (410) 461-2400, you can schedule an appointment time for laser therapy.

59. Do you board dogs and cats?

Yes! We love boarding your pets while you are away! Cats sleep in their private cat condos and dogs are taken outside to romp and play! At your request we also administer your supplements, medications and special diets. Please call our front desk at 410 461-2400 and one of our helpful team members will schedule a boarding reservation for your pet.

60. Do you groom cats and dogs?

Yes! Our groomers groom all breeds of dogs and cats. The dogs are combed, bathed, clipped and scissored to meet your needs and the lifestyle of your pet! They go home refreshed, beautiful and smelling great! Please call our front desk at 410 461-2400 and one of our helpful team members will help you schedule a grooming appointment.

61. Should I get my refill prescriptions from my veterinarian?

Yes! The veterinary industry is concerned about the use of online pharmacies in regards to the medication’s effectiveness and safety for the health of your animal. Many online pharmacies are not regulated. Some may use products or ingredients from foreign countries that have not been approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Veterinarians who offer prescription medications within their practice provide a service of convenience for which you may pay a bit more, but they also offer clients the satisfaction that the product they are receiving from the veterinary clinic is a safe and quality product, approved for use in animals by the stringent standards of the Food and Drug Administration, manufactured, transported, and stored correctly. Our veterinarians will also provide information regarding the proper use of the prescribed drug and the risks associated with its use.

Location Hours
Monday8:00am – 7:00pm
Tuesday8:00am – 7:00pm
Wednesday8:00am – 7:00pm
Thursday8:00am – 7:00pm
Friday8:00am – 7:00pm
Saturday8:00am – 1:00pm
SundayClosed